Calcium sufficiency strikes new low - Golf Course Industry

2022-05-28 20:07:35 By : Mr. JACKY NIU

PACE Turf: Calcium levels of 330 ppm or higher yields performance and saves supers dollars.

A new yardstick for calcium levels in turfgrass soils has been established. Data show that calcium levels of 330 parts per million or higher (at pH levels of 5.5 to 6.0 or higher) should yield expected turf performance and allow superintendents to save dollars. The new soil guidelines, titled Minimum Level for Sustainable Nutrition (MLSN), were generated by Dr. Micah Woods, the chief scientist at Asian Turfgrass Center, working in concert with PACE Turf and its director Dr. Larry Stowell. The researchers discuss their work developing the new guideline in a video “Minimum Level for Sustainable Nutrition: The Calcium Guideline” now showing on YouTube. Dr. Stowell said the effort to find a new recommendation level for calcium began with a question: “How can we do a better job of resource management in cutting the required nutrients down just to the minimum to maintain the turf at the expected performance levels?” BCSR or Base Cation Saturation Ratios, which are noted in percentages (Ca%, Mg%, K%), are still used today and frequently over-recommend the application of calcium. But “we don’t think BCSR has a role any further in turfgrass management systems,” Dr. Stowell said. SLAN or Sufficiency Levels of Available Nutrients is another guideline recommendation widely used today that finds calcium levels should be greater than 750 ppm.  “We asked, how low can you go to maintain acceptable performance,” Dr. Stowell said. Dr. Woods said, “I started thinking about this . . .because I kept seeing soil samples or nutrient levels in the soil where the levels of elements such as potassium, calcium and others were according to conventional soil recommendation guidelines . . . really low. But when we looked at the turfgrass performance--the quality of the grass, the health of the grass--the performance of the turf as a playing surface seemed very good. So here we are with levels in the soil that seem like they’re really low by conventional thinking about soil testing or interpretation, and yet the turf was performing extremely well. So I made some calculations of how much of an element is actually in the soil and how does that relate to expected turf uptake?” Sharing data, Drs. Woods and Stowell created the new category of soil nutrient guidelines called Minimum Levels for Sustainable Nutrition or MLSNs. These guidelines focus on sustainability, reduced inputs and reduced cost of maintenance, all while maintaining expected turf performance. “We're not talking about compromising turf performance, we’re just talking about being smarter with the way the nutrients are utilized,” Dr. Stowell said. Drs. Stowell and Woods recommend superintendents maintain a level of 330 ppm of calcium in the soil (while maintaining pH levels of 5.5 to 6.0 or higher to ward off aluminum/manganese toxicity). Higher amounts of calcium applied would not be as sustainable. “The only problem with using the older SLAN or BCSR guidelines for calcium is primarily cost,” Dr. Stowell said. “So it doesn’t mean that you can’t grow good grass using SLAN or BCSR guidelines, it just means that you’re not getting the most out of your investment.” Of his work Dr. Woods said he looks forward to “seeing lots more good performing turfgrass areas at a more sustainable level of calcium in the soil.” The video “Minimum Level for Sustainable Nutrition: The Calcium Guideline” is the third-in-a-series of “Interviews with the Experts” videos produced by PACE Turf. Like other PACE Turf videos, this one is practical, to the point, and contains information that can be put to immediate use. PACE Turf videos can be placed on superintendent association websites or golf course websites by clicking on the “Share” button that appears underneath the video on YouTube. PACE Turf’s other golfer education and superintendent education videos can be viewed on the PACE Turf YouTube Channel or http://www.youtube.com/user/paceturf. PACE Turf is a membership organization that provides breaking research news, information and expert advice on its website www.paceturf.org.  The mission of PACE Turf is to generate and share independent and objective agronomic information for turf professionals, so they may develop management programs that are effective, practical and scientifically sound.  

Largest single gift to GCSAA’s philanthropy.

The Kendrick B. Melrose Family Foundation has donated $1 million to the Environmental Institute for Golf (EIFG) to support the professional development of golf course superintendents through participation in the annual GCSAA Education Conference and Golf Industry Show. The EIFG is the philanthropic organization of the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America, and has as its mission to foster sustainability through research, awareness, education, programs and scholarships for the benefit of golf course management professionals, golf facilities and the game. The Melrose Family Foundation is supported by Ken Melrose, former CEO and chairman of the Toro Co. Melrose's relationship with the golf industry is longstanding as he joined the Toro Co., in 1970. He quickly ascended the ranks of the company culminating with his appointment as CEO in 1983 and chairman of the board of directors in 1987. He retired as CEO in 2005 and from the chairman position in 2006. That same year he formed Leading by Serving, LLC, a new company whose mission is to advance the principles of servant leadership in business organizations. "I have a profound respect for golf course superintendents and their role in the game of golf," Melrose said. "For golf courses to be successful, they need highly competent superintendents. Golf course management has become an increasingly more difficult profession, so to be able to provide resources to enhance superintendents' professional development has been very important to me. Together the GCSAA and the EIFG are the best organizations to deliver the education and training that will not only benefit the professional, but their facilities and the game." The gift is the largest to be given to the EIFG. With the donation, the Melrose Leadership Academy will be developed. Through an application and selection process, 20 individuals will be selected to participate, beginning in 2013. The program will take into account financial need, geography, facility size, requirements necessary to achieve GCSAA Class A membership status and other factors. While attending the GCSAA Education Conference and Golf Industry Show, participants will also be provided opportunities to network with GCSAA and other industry leaders. The academy will offer education specific to risk management (health, safety, environmental compliance), operational efficiency, business and environmental stewardship. "We are deeply appreciative of The Melrose Family Foundation's generous support of the EIFG and GCSAA members," GCSAA Chief Executive Officer Rhett Evans said. "Ken has been a leader in the golf industry and it was his vision to support our mission by providing resources to enhance the competencies of our members. We believe one of the best – if not the best – professional development opportunities for our members is to attend the conference and show. Through Ken's vision we are able to make it a reality for more of our members." In addition to Melrose's work through Leading by Serving, he is also actively serving on the board of directors for the Center for Ethical Business Cultures, Park Nicollet Health Services, The Melrose Institute for Eating Disorders, and others. He is also a member of the faculty at the Opus School of Business at the University of St. Thomas. Melrose is a native of Orlando, Fla., and earned a double major in mathematics and electrical engineering from Princeton in 1962. He received his master's degree from the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and later an MBA from the University of Chicago.    

Largest single gift to GCSAA’s philanthropy.

The Kendrick B. Melrose Family Foundation has donated $1 million to the Environmental Institute for Golf (EIFG) to support the professional development of golf course superintendents through participation in the annual GCSAA Education Conference and Golf Industry Show. The EIFG is the philanthropic organization of the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America, and has as its mission to foster sustainability through research, awareness, education, programs and scholarships for the benefit of golf course management professionals, golf facilities and the game. The Melrose Family Foundation is supported by Ken Melrose, former CEO and chairman of the Toro Co. Melrose's relationship with the golf industry is longstanding as he joined the Toro Co., in 1970. He quickly ascended the ranks of the company culminating with his appointment as CEO in 1983 and chairman of the board of directors in 1987. He retired as CEO in 2005 and from the chairman position in 2006. That same year he formed Leading by Serving, LLC, a new company whose mission is to advance the principles of servant leadership in business organizations. "I have a profound respect for golf course superintendents and their role in the game of golf," Melrose said. "For golf courses to be successful, they need highly competent superintendents. Golf course management has become an increasingly more difficult profession, so to be able to provide resources to enhance superintendents' professional development has been very important to me. Together the GCSAA and the EIFG are the best organizations to deliver the education and training that will not only benefit the professional, but their facilities and the game." The gift is the largest to be given to the EIFG. With the donation, the Melrose Leadership Academy will be developed. Through an application and selection process, 20 individuals will be selected to participate, beginning in 2013. The program will take into account financial need, geography, facility size, requirements necessary to achieve GCSAA Class A membership status and other factors. While attending the GCSAA Education Conference and Golf Industry Show, participants will also be provided opportunities to network with GCSAA and other industry leaders. The academy will offer education specific to risk management (health, safety, environmental compliance), operational efficiency, business and environmental stewardship. "We are deeply appreciative of The Melrose Family Foundation's generous support of the EIFG and GCSAA members," GCSAA Chief Executive Officer Rhett Evans said. "Ken has been a leader in the golf industry and it was his vision to support our mission by providing resources to enhance the competencies of our members. We believe one of the best – if not the best – professional development opportunities for our members is to attend the conference and show. Through Ken's vision we are able to make it a reality for more of our members." In addition to Melrose's work through Leading by Serving, he is also actively serving on the board of directors for the Center for Ethical Business Cultures, Park Nicollet Health Services, The Melrose Institute for Eating Disorders, and others. He is also a member of the faculty at the Opus School of Business at the University of St. Thomas. Melrose is a native of Orlando, Fla., and earned a double major in mathematics and electrical engineering from Princeton in 1962. He received his master's degree from the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and later an MBA from the University of Chicago.    

Fast-acting granular insecticide targets surface-feeding insects.

FMC Professional Solutionsannounced the launch of Talstar XTRA GC granular insecticide, the newest addition to its expanding line of Talstar solutions. Specifically designed for golf courses with a greens-grade, sand-core granule, Talstar XTRA GC protects greens, tees, fairways, roughs and ornamental plants without damage. It is the only granular insecticide that combines the proven residual of Talstar with the speed of the active ingredient, zeta-cypermethrin. For golf course superintendents, this means quick and long-term control of a wide range of surface-feeding insects, such as ants (including red imported fire ants), cutworms, sod webworms, armyworms, mole crickets and more. “When used as directed, Talstar XTRA GC eliminates fire ant colonies in 15 minutes or less—while other products take days or weeks to work,” said Adam Manwarren, FMC product manager for turf and ornamental products. “For best results, treat roughs, greens, green surrounds and bunker faces early before ant populations build." Talstar XTRA GC features an optimized formulation that rapidly disrupts the insect’s nervous system. Though the formulation acts very fast, it doesn’t sacrifice the residual—two to four months—that superintendents have come to expect from Talstar. The unique, dense sand granule penetrates thatch to reach surface-feeding pests yet appears invisible to golfers due to its small size. Talstar XTRA GC is approved for broadcast or mound applications on all turf varieties, making it a versatile,valuable and low-cost component of an ongoing insect control program. It is labeled for control of ants (including imported fire ants), cutworms, webworms, armyworms, mole crickets and more. And when applied in temperate zone regions where forsythia is in full bloom, Talstar XTRA GC will control annual bluegrass weevil adults for three to four weeks. Talstar XTRA GC is now available from FMC authorized distributors. The product is sold in 50-pound bags, so 12 bags will cover 3 acres at the high label rate. Talstar XTRA GC is a restricted use pesticide.

GCI's Kyle Brown and Heather Tunstall generate $1,750 for charity at BASF's Superintendent Pyramid.

While most everyone was focused on the game of golf at GIS 2012, GCI associate editor Kyle Brown was had a different goal Thursday afternoon: The top of the Superintendent Pyramid. Superintendents at the show had the chance to play the game, based on the TV game show “The $10,000 Pyramid,” at the BASF Professional Turf & Ornamental booth throughout the week to win money for their courses. At the end of the show, industry media professionals were invited to play to raise money for charity in their own special rounds hosted by Tom Hill, communications manager for BASF. Brown and Heather Tunstall, web content manager, teamed up to play for The Movember Foundation, raising money to support research and treatment of men’s cancers. Given just 30 seconds, they guessed clues based on the category “Worth your salt,” including pretzels, margaritas and even sailors. Correctly naming five of the six responses in the time limit, they won $1,750 for the charity. “I usually have pretty bad luck, so I was worried we wouldn’t be able to win anything for the Movember Foundation even in Las Vegas,” says Brown. “I’m glad we were able to raise money for them and have fun with BASF at the same time.” “Getting off the show floor for a bit of excitement and friendly competition among fellow industry media professionals was a nice complement to a great GIS, and I very much enjoyed the experience,” says Tunstall. This year, the combined total of winnings going to charity for media pros is $7,550.